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spill in u.s. history. in its guilty plea, b.p. said it deeply regrets the loss of life and almost five million barrels of oil that into the gulf. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: justice department officials hope today's settlement and criminal pleas will bring justice to the families of the men who died when the "deepwater horizon" exploded. >> perhaps the greatest tragedy is that the deaths of the 11 men on board the "deepwater horizon" could have been avoided. the explosion of the rig was a disaster that resulted from b.p.'s culture of privileging profit over prudence. >> reporter: b.p. has agreed to plead guilty to 11 counts of felony manslaughter and one felony count of lying to congress. in addition, two b.p. supervisors on the deepwater rig have been charged with 23 counts of manslaughter. another b.p. executive was charged with lying to congress. b.p. will also pay a record- setting $4 billion in criminal fines and penalties. thrown in with the criminal charges is a civil settlement with the securities and exchange commission. b.p. will pay more than half a billion dollars to
to the streets this weekend. >> now that we know who our president is and what he's willing to do for us, we are even more excited about getting him re-elected. >> this morning we hit 600 houses. this afternoon we probably hit about 20 or 0 houses. not everybody was home but enough people were home that we were able to spread the word. >> woodruff: we assess the polls and the state of the race on election eve with stuart rothenberg, susan page, and andrew kohut. >> ifill: lawyers gear up to monitor polling stations tomorrow. what will they find? jeffrey brown takes a look. >> woodruff: and from legalizing marijuana to gay marriage and taxes, we break down ballot measures worth watching. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: all its own. with united health care, i got help that fit my life, information on my phone, connection to doctors who get where i'm from and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never miss a beat. >> we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in n
to washington-- if the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff, it would push the economy into a recession. and late today, a top credit rating agency puts the odds of going off the cliff at 15%. plus, how g.o.p. economic policies could change as election day demographics change. that and more tonight on nbr! the u.s. economy would be driven into recession next year if the fiscal cliff is not solved in time. that's the warning again today from the congressional budget office. and the standard and poor's ratings agency said there's an increasing chance we will go over that cliff of tax increases and spending cuts. it puts the odds at 15%. still, s&p is optimistic about a solution, saying "the most likely scenario, in our view, is that policymakers reach sufficient political compromise in time to avoid most, if not all, potential economic effects of the cliff." both s&p and the congressional budget office warned unemployment would go over 9% by the end of next year if the cliff is triggered. those s&p comments hit the market in the last 30 minutes of trading, extending yesterday's sharp losses. the do
years after a massive oil spill at daily inched the u.s. coast. --deluged the u.s. coast. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. there are real concerns that the conflict between palestinian militants in gaza and israel could spark a wider conflict in the region. air raid fire sounded in the israeli city of tel aviv as rockets were fired towards it. the assaults underlines the rising tension. >> tonight, sirens sounding across tel aviv. the commercial capital and most populous city now a target for the rockets being fired by militants -- militants in gaza. people to cover bread they could. there were no casualties -- people took cover where they could. there were no casualties. >> i saw a flash of light. 2 kilometers in the direction of the seat. the rocket landed in the seat. >> targeting tel aviv marks a significant escalation of this growing conflict. the body of the man held responsible by his it -- by israel for launching hundreds of rockets from gauze that. -- gaza. at his funeral in gaza city, the military commander was carried to the streets
to go before the u.s. presidential election, a new jobs report is fueling arguments on the campaign trail. it seems to have something for everyone. president obama is time-outing that more jobs were -- touting that more jobs have been created than were expected. romney says the overall elm ploit rate is actually up. now startshe weekend blitz and the bbc's adam brooks has been watching the reaction for us. >> the voter in the state of ohio -- >> in 2008 we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the great depression. today our businesses have created nearly 5 1/2 million new jobs and this morning we learned the companies hired more workers in october than at any time in the last eight months. >> new jobs were created in america in october. 171,000 of them, many in health care, retail and business services. many more people returned to the workforce, possibly a sign of economic optimism. but still these are not numbers to excite a tired and skittish electorate. mitt romney, campaigning in wisconsin, trying to erode mr. obama's support in the midwest. he too
states to visit. president obama uses the final hours to campaign for every vote he can. >> after all we've been through together, we can't give up now. because we've got more change to do. >> his rival, mitt romney, traveled to four states to make his final pitch for a change in the white house. >> you hoped that president obama would live up to his promise to bring people together and to solve problem. he hasn't. i will. >> and if you live here, the election is secondary. a week after sandy blew through in new york neighborhood, it's still waiting for help. welcome to our viewers on public television in america. and also around the globe. for those of you despairing that this presidential election has gone on far too long, good news. it's almost over. the final day of campaigning saw the candidates flying across the country in a last bid for votes. tonight we have comprehensive coverage of how the campaign looks at the very end. the bbc north american editor has been with the obama campaign in wisconsin. he starts our coverage. >> win or lose, it's the last time he'll campaign to save
evening i'm susie gharib. u.s. stocks are trading again, after hurricane sandy forces an historic two-day shutdown. >> tom: wall street gets back to business, as damage and recovery estimates start to climb, plus, what it takes to restore power to millions in the northeast. >> susie: and with stocks open for trading, no surprise, home depot was the dow's standout. >> tom: lots ahead, that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: an historic day on here on wall street, after the storm of the century knocked down the financial district. us stock markets resumed operations today after two days in the dark, stocks were little changed: both the dow and the nasdaq fell 10 points, but the s&p 500 gained a fraction. trading here at the new york stock exchange opened without a hitch. the new york stock exchange opened right on time. and as new york's mayor bloomberg rang the opening bell this morning, traders were happy to be back to work. it looked like a normal day, with the buzz of activity, traders milling about. it was anything but normal no one knows that better than larry leibowitz, the
on this planet. it's at war with us." >> and-- >> there's something fundamentally flawed about a system where in order to get elected the members of congress have to rely on the very people who are lobbying them day in and day out. because that's their principal source of funding, those lobbyists and the interests they represent. >> funding is provided by: carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org." anne gumowitz. the betsy and jesse fink foundation. the hkh
that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: after another day of violence, a ceasefire deal between israel and hamas was finally announced in cairo today. but further negotiations on key longer-term sticking points between the two sides were put off for now. egypt's foreign minister, mohammed kamel amr, announced the breakthrough with secretary of state hillary clinton at his side. >> egypt has exerted efforts and conducted intensive discussions since the renewed outbreak of hostilities in the gaza strip with all parties: the palestinian leadership, the these efforts and communications managed to reach an agreement to a ceasefire and the return of calm and halt of the violence and the bloodshed that was witnessed recently. >> the united states welcomes the agreement today for a ceasefire in gaza. for it to hold, the rocket attacks must end, a broader calm returned. in the days ahe
in need of a spark find one in october? u.s. employers across nearly all sectors were hiring, for a net gain of 171,000 new jobs. the labor department also revised its august and september figures higher, by 84,000. all told, it signaled slow but steady growth, and it was news that president obama wanted to play up in the campaign's final weekend, especially in one critical state. >> "oh (io), oh (io)" >> brown: the president made three stops in the buckeye state, starting in hilliard, just outside columbus. >> in 2008, we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the great depression. and today, our businesses have created nearly five and a half million new jobs. and this morning, we learned that companies hired more workers in october than at any time in the last eight months. ( applause ) >> brown: and the trend line seemed promising, as well. since july, the economy has added an average of 173,000 jobs per month, up from just 67,000 a month in the spring. at the same time, though, the unemployment rate ticked up a tenth of a point in october to 7.9% as more
and immigration? we explore the challenges ahead in the next four years. >> ifill: and back with us again, for analysis, are mark shields and david brooks. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: for the first time in four years, president obama did not have to worry about re-election today. still, there was little time to savor tuesday's victory, in the face of a potential fiscal crisis at the end of the year. "newshour" correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage on this day after the election of 2012. >> reporter: mr. obama departed his hometown of chicago this afternoon for washington, his home for another four years. waiting for him: a still- divided congress now facing a critical lame duck session.
has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the u.s. death toll from the giant storm named sandy has risen to at least 63 today. about 6.5 million homes and businesses are still without electricity though there were signs of daily life returning to its usual rhythm in some places. a familiar sound returned to lower manhattan streets last night. ( horns honking ) the power did not. police helped direct traffic with signals still dark, but one taxi driver said it wasn't worth the risk. >> it's been dangerous. i've got to go home, i'll walk. there's no traffic signal light, no nothing there. >> woodruff: you're going home? you're done? >> i'm done already. >> woodruff: it wasn't much easier for pedestrians who made their way on foot, some with only flashlights leading the way. >> it's really uns
to preventing the u.s. economy from falling off the fiscal cliff. while washington struggles on a fiscal cliff deal, what should you do about your portfolio? jeff applegate has some answers. he's chief investment officer at morgan stanley smith barney. and home depot hammers home strong gains and lays the foundation for a strong quarter ahead. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." it was another day of cliff- watching here on wall street today. investors and traders are waiting to hear what happens at an important white house meeting on friday between president obama and congressional leaders. they will be talking about ways to solve the so-called "fiscal cliff" dilemma. investors appear cautious about making any big moves until they know whether the cliff will trigger increases in capital gains and dividend taxes. the dow fell almost 59 points, the nasdaq lost 20, and the s&p was down five. meanwhile, in washington, congress returned to work for the first time since september. lawmakers face a long "to-do list," and getting a deal on that fiscal cliff is right at the top. darren gersh reports. >>
is in virginia. with the election just five days away, cautiously, politicians are moving on. >> he used to make the space where he would scrunch up his face -- >> but others never will. she lost her son to the storm. jacob was 23. he and a friend were crushed by falling tree. >> he kept calling me every 20 minutes, and finally, -- i kept calling him every 20 minutes, and finally, a man answered his phone, and i asked who he was. he said he was detective simon, and i asked where my son was, and he asked my address, said he wanted to come to my apartment. >> the lights are out. the power gone. in manhattan alone, 750,000 people are without electricity. every day that passes, businesses are losing money. >> i have never seen anything like it. look at this. what a mess. >> do you have power? >> do i have power? no, i am in the dark. >> there is one ray of light, and it is underground. the new york subway began offering restricted service this morning, allowing some commuters to take their usual journey, but it will be many months before the familiar everyday parts of the city returned. >> for more
to get us support at the polls. -- to get the best support at the polls. >> this is america, a democracy. this is what it is all about. >> will he stay in power for another four years or be rejected after one term? the president is checking to make sure there is no backsliding from supporters. >> we feel confident that we will win, but it will determine on voter turnout. -- be determined by voter turnout. i would encourage everyone to participate in this process that people have fought so hard for us to have. >> more than 90 million americans are expected to vote today. all eyes are on the ohio, one of just eight states that could go either way and will decide the election. >> i am not thrilled with either choice, but i will stick with barack. >> we are really sick with what has been going on with the fans in the last four years. >> after america elected its first black president cannot many were filled with hope. >> -- its first black president, many were filled with hope. >> they are trying to rebuild the giant coalition using colder, more technical tactics. they call it the ground gam
? >> they had multiple paths to get to 270. they used almost all of them. they were able to through very focused data-driven ground operation identify their voters and successfully reassemble the coalition that they had in 2008. african americans, latino, -- latinos, young voters, women. would young voters turn out in the numbers they did before? in fact, they were by one point a higher percentage than they were in 2008. would african americans vote with the same enthusiasm compared to 2008? they did. it was 15%. this was a campaign that set its sights early and improving on what everybody thought was a very good ground operation and they exceeded it. gwen: in a very specific way, not in a broad base at all and not in a way that was out to persuade anyone who had not voted for them before. >> it was not much of a persuasion. they started with the baseline of the 2008 results. and then they had the census from 2010. they saw what had changed and who had moved around. and then it's the sole reason that jim mussina moved to chicago and started building this thing. it became obama for america. they
will lead daily operations. >> susie: that and more tonight on nbr! >> tom: u.s. markets turned their attention back to the economy today; investors and traders liked what they heard. americans are feeling the most optimistic they have been in nearly five years about their finances and the outlook for the economy. the conference board's confidence index jumped to a reading of 72.2 last month. driving that gain, an improving job market. new claims for unemployment insurance fell by 9,000 in the past week to 363,000, showing modest improvement in the jobs picture. we'll have more on jobs in a moment. as for stocks, the dow gained 136 points, the nasdaq was up 42, the s&p adding 15. >> susie: but economists say that encouraging report on jobless claims and the confidence survey were collected before hurricane sandy. meanwhile, the effects of the monster storm are paralyzing much of new jersey and new york city here's an update: four and a half million people are still without power, and it could take another ten days before power is restored. limited flights have resumed at all of
the election. u.s. businesses added 171,000 jobs in october across many industries. four days after sandy, the gas crunch in jersey, access to cash in the northeast and controversy nixes sunday's running of the new york city marathon. that and more tonight on "n.b.r.!" we begin with jobs. employers beefed up their payrolls last month, adding more jobs than expected as more americans counted themselves among the labor force. the official labor department count shows 171,000 jobs were created last month. that's much stroer than the 125,000 analysts were looking for. and the government revised its september new job count up to 148,000. thanks to more people looking for work, the unemployment rate rose slightly to 7.9%. darren gersh has the story from washington d.c. >> reporter: the october employment report makes it clear a jobs recovery is solidly underway. >> i think the key message there is that employment growth has been taken up a notch. over the last three months we've added over 170,000 jobs on average. that's a little bit better than what we've been seeing. that is enough over the l
was indispensable as crucial to the good news. >> we will get to climate change next. >> for us to say that this is what i generation and will not happen again, i think it would be shortsighted. part of learning from this is the recognition that climate change is a reality, extreme weather is a reality. >> new york governor andrew cuomo also said that 100-year storms are coming every two years. hate to bring his name up, but how or predicted this. -- al gore predicted this. >> he sure did. >> they have seeress in the netherlands -- sea barriers in the netherlands. >> this may not be a question of the sea barriers. this heavy jet stream that came through -- that is caused by some of the warming taking place in the arctic. hence global warming is a problem. >> but back to al gore. al gore did not talk about the environment when he was running for president, and these guys did not talk -- >> when he was running in 1988 he talked about it. >> when you have the mitt romney as governor running against this obama, their positions would not have been different mitt romney ndorser of cap- and-t
we know some of you are, you can also follow us tonight on our multichannel live stream. there can find up-to-the-minute results on our interactive map center. you can find a live election blog. you can find speeches from the winners and losers that will be coming along later tonight, and a whole lot more. >> ifill: here with us in our election night studio, which is very spiffy, if i say so myself, as they will be all evening long-- they're spiffy, too, and how long-- >> woodruff: especially when you see the overhead shot. >> ifill: mark shield, and david brooks, and michael beschloss, and richard norton smith, and we're going to talk among ourselves for just a moment what we see coming. what are you watching for, david? >> florida and virginia right now. you want-- >> ifill: do you have a white board? >> i wish i did. i'm not that spiffy. we talked a lot about ohio. but to get to ohio mitt romney has to hurdle florida and virginia. and we've really got no real information but little whiffes of information, looking pretty competitive in both places. so the romney people should be
, showing that unless there's a deal on solving the crisis, the u.s. economy would suffer big time. the obama administration's economists estimate consumers would spend about $200 billion less next year than they would have otherwise. congress and the administration have only a few more weeks to nail down a deal. but that deal will have to address some tough issues, including entitlement reform. darren gersh explains. >> reporter: the big money in entitlements is in health care, and that means any grand bargain to avoid the fiscal cliff will slice away at one of the nation's most popular programs. >> medicare is clearly in the gunsights. >> reporter: it's possible congress and the president could agree to save $300 to $400 billion from medicare by cutting fees for doctors and hospitals. but analysts worry slashing payments won't make the health care system more efficient. >> this is not really a way to structurally change medicare and if you don't change the underlying incentives, you don't get long-term savings. >> reporter: progressives at the center for american progress say the
in colorado. but the president is doing well in iowa an nevada with the early vote which tells us a little bit how this thing is starting to break. >> we close this evening with this question what is the impact of the digital revolution on books, writers and publishing. joining me ken auletta, tim o reilly, jonathan safran foer an jane frieman. >> i like the idea of ebooks how they can democratize books. ma what i am afraid of is on platforms that have distracks an are inherently fast makes it harder to make books books. >> it is so important to have historical perspective. you know what we consider the book today is a relatively recent historical phenomenon. i totally disagree that homer would recognize the book. you know actually we probably more recognize the ebook. >> rose: hurricane sandy, politics and publishing when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> this has been a difficult week for the city of new york four days after hurricane sandy made landfa
america's never been about what can be done for us, it's about what can be done by us to the hard and frustrating but necessary work of self-government. that's the principle we were founded on. >> rose: many saw this election as a choice between starkly different visions of america, particularly the role of government and how to fix the economy. throughout the campaign, president obama emphasized the need for balancing individualism with collective values. in doing so, he echoed the language of the new deal as franklin delano roosevelt once said "in our personal ambitions we're individualalists but in seeking political progress as a nation we all go up or else all go down as one people." its remains to be seen whether the country can heal the wounds in the shadow of the fiscal cliff. we watch as president obama seeks to make good on his promises in a second term. joining me from chicago is bill daley. he served as white house chief of staff from january 2011 to january 2012. in february he was appointed as a co-chair of the president's reelection campaign. so my question first is
heats up. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the u.s. presidential election is just one day away, and that was the hot topic here on wall street. but investors were still cautious about making major moves ahead of the election, so stocks posted just modest gains, and trading volume was light. the dow rose 19 points, the nasdaq added 17, and the s&p up three points. but, where stocks go from here may depend on who wins the white house tomorrow night. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: wall street is hardly back to normal, with reminders of hurricane sandy still obvious everywhere. but, at least the presidential election could provide a distraction for those coping with the storm's aftermath. the question is will the stock market continue to distract in the days following tomorrow's big contest? that may depend on its outcome. like many on wall street, nyse trader jonathan corpina predicts a mitt romney win will be a big win for stock prices. >> i think when you see new regimes, new presidents come in to play in sort of a turmoil time, that change is always viewed as
awad joins us now. he's investment strategist at zephyr management. >> so, jim, what do you think investors need to hear from the president that they feel confident about investing in the markets? >> right now, there is nothing he is willing to do that would make investors comfortable. you'll notice today that the market sold off during and after his press conference because he was very aggressive in his position. and whether that's a negotiating point or not, i think what the markets fear is that we could either accidentally go over the cliff, or that all this hard posturing will set in stage a series of contractionery economic activities on the parts of businesses, in terms of not hiring, and maybe firing, and businesses shrinking rather than expanding, which will eventually find its way into consumer attitudes. so i think the market is afraid that this gun battle, or dual or chess game will lead to an accidental recession. >> susie: all right. let me follow up on that. a lot of the traders i've been talking to here feel that the president is setting up a divide. so are you sayi
frequency, for to us sit here today and say, "well, this is once in a generation and it's not going to happen again," i think would be shortsighted and i think we need to anticipate more of these extreme weather-type situations in the future. and we have to take that's into consideration in reform, mottifying our infrastructure, our built environment. >> rose: new york city mayor michael bloomberg began and ended his briefing at city hall with words to those who lost hay loved one in the hurricane. new yorkers everywhere joined him extending their thoughts to the victims of disaster. >> everyone here hearts go out to the families of those who lost family in the storm and those who lost their homes. our thoughts and prayers are with everyone and we certainly will give our full support in the next weeks and months to those hurt by the storm. >> rose: we turn to an interview we taped earlier this week with the actor denzel washington. and director bob zemeckis. >> it all comes down to the script for me. when i read a screen play that i can't put down, and when i read a screen play that
on reporting this story. >> the most important thing i've learned is really how vulnerable so much us are. you don't have to report the story, you just need to look at the tv and sandy over the last few days. what's so amazing about the storm was the sheer size. it struck 50, 60 million americans and did so almost simultaneously and that really truly taxed the ability of any society to respond to that. you couldn't borrow personnel, new york couldn't take personnel from new jersey or connecticut because everyone was going to be hit at once. we're all in this together and you have to accept that fact. >> rose: there's this question also which is the argument that's been made over the last years with increasing velocity. it is that cyber attacks could produce some of the same results we're experiencing today by being able to damage the electric grid in an even more severe way. >> yes, absolutely. that's a scary thought. we've seen just what life is like with a few million people without power. you can see the grid go down in a large way, if it was not easy to put it back together again. of cou
. that's an early night for us all. althoughs pennsylvania better than i do. i don't think it's been awe thenltally in play. i think there was a series of head fakes going on but that's never been a central battleground. >> rose: mark? >> well, they're winning pennsylvania because this is the first campaign where no one has to make choices about money because they have enough to spend and they had extra money and there wasn't any other place to put and the public polls make it clear it's closer. the president will win by a more narrow margin than four years ago. i think that the -- i agree with matthew the fundamentals matter most of all. ohio is a tricky place, though, because while the economy is better than it was, still not particularly good. >> rose: is ohio enough for governor romney? >> if he wins the southern states and colorado it's enough. >> and i think one of the conversations maybe we'll have in the aftermath of this is one of the things he's had in ohio-- and it's the electoral problem that he has had-- is that the electoral college moved from an advantage they had to a dem
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)

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